The survey of physicians satisfaction of implementing “audit and feedback” and “printed educational materials” interventions for rational drug prescribing in cities of Tehran and Mashhad, Iran

  • Fatemeh Shahriyari School of Pharmacy, International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Arash Rashidian Department of Global Health and Public Policy, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Fatemeh Soleymani Department of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Administration, School of Pharmacy AND Pharmaceutical Management and Economics Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Amir Sarayani Research Center for Rational Use of Drugs, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Abbas Kebriaeezade Department of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Administration, School of Pharmacy AND Pharmaceutical Management and Economics Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Drug therapy, Educational technology, Physicians, Iran

Abstract

Background: Many countries including Iran have used “audit and feedback” (A&F) and “printed educational materials” (PEMs) interventions to improve physicians’ drug prescribing behavior. In addition, several trials have shown low to moderate effects of the two interventions. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed physicians’ satisfactions with A&F or PEM interventions. This is a cross-sectional survey which was carried out in Tehran and Mashhad Cities, Iran, in 2014.Methods: 181 general physicians, pediatricians and infectious disease specialists working in outpatient practices completed the questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, satisfaction with the A&F and PEM, and the perceived effectiveness of the interventions in improving physicians’ behavior.Results: Almost all physicians who reported receiving A&F or PEM reports, indicated reading them. In addition, 84% and 86% of the physicians agreed with the efficiency of feedback reports and PEM, respectively.Conclusion: Findings showed that general physicians study A&F reports more carefully or frequently than the specialists. Physicians believed that revising the feedback report’s format and content could increase its effectiveness.

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Published
2018-06-23
How to Cite
1.
Shahriyari F, Rashidian A, Soleymani F, Sarayani A, Kebriaeezade A. The survey of physicians satisfaction of implementing “audit and feedback” and “printed educational materials” interventions for rational drug prescribing in cities of Tehran and Mashhad, Iran. JPPM. 2(3/4):55-9.
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Original Article(s)